pursuivant

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pursuivant

1. History a state or royal messenger
2. History a follower or attendant
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References in periodicals archive ?
Once the pursuivants had located it, and found it empty, they were inclined to assume that the house was clean, and so fail to search for another.
then goes the Privy Councellors that are not Peers of the realme, then two Pursuivants goes.
Segar presented a paper on heraldic officers and their jurisdictions and duties; there were several reports of the theft of books, pedigrees, and visitation records from the College's library; and an anonymous delegation of heralds and pursuivants presented a petition against Brooke to deputies Hoby and Carew.
The source of the French collection's version of one of them, on heralds and pursuivants, is given in one of the edition's three appendices.
Her entourage, known as pursuivants and heralds, will now take part in a separate procession while 14 others have been axed completely.
Sports have become a religion, athletic contests with millions of pursuivants, fans devotees of radio talk shows and all those glutinizing sports announcers and broadcasting oafs who for impressionable youngsters have made dumbness even fashionable.
In an age of persecution, it was necessary, of course, for papist priests to change their names often if they hoped to escape the attentions of the pursuivants.
Who needs the Lord Lyon King of Arms (the wonderfully-named Sir Malcolm Rognvald Innes of Edingight), plus his heralds and pursuivants, such as Sir Francis Grant, the Albany Herald who led off the proclamation of the Queen's Accession in 1952, aged 87; the Lord High Constable, The Hereditary Bearer of the Royal Banner of Scotland and, in an historic piece of over-manning, The Hereditary Bearer of the National Flag of Scotland?
There's a selected bibliography to cut out and save for her pursuivants and devotees, eleven pages listing articles on or about her, which she has enthusiastically annotated, pieces culled mostly from small or college dailies, many from far-flung areas like Antwerp or the Netherlands and often not longer than a paragraph ("Account of Paglia's lecture at Williams College," a piece from the Sydney Australian, reviews of Sexual Personae, etc.