pus

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pus,

thick white or yellowish fluid that forms in areas of infection such as wounds and abscesses. It is constituted of decomposed body tissue, bacteria (or other micro-organisms that cause the infection), and certain white blood cells. These white cells form one of the defense mechanisms of the body. Known as phagocytes, they rush to the area of infection and engulf the invading bacteria in a process called phagocytosis. Many white cells themselves succumb in the process and become one of the constituents of pus.

pus

[pəs]
(medicine)
A viscous, creamy, pale-yellow or yellow-green fluid produced by liquefaction necrosis in a neutrophil-rich exudate.

pus

the yellow or greenish fluid product of inflammation, composed largely of dead leucocytes, exuded plasma, and liquefied tissue cells
References in periodicals archive ?
The best evidence right now is that for simple cellulitis (no purulence, abscess, or exudate), treatment with a beta-lactam antibiotic is the best option.
Ninety percent of patients had complete relief in sputum purulence, 10% had putty colored sputum.
A recent Cochrane review has also supported the use of antibiotic therapy for patients who are moderately or severely ill with AECOPD with increased cough and sputum purulence.
Intraoperatively, purulence around the maxillary incisors and a thick, boggy sinus mucosa were encountered.
Specific antimicrobial treatment is indicated whenever there is an increase in cough/ dyspnea together with increased sputum volume and/or purulence (Murtagh 2008).
Contamination or purulence at the catheter insertion site is seen in less than half the cases.
No purulence was seen from the femoral dimple, though there was some erythema.
Sputum Gram stain obtained on admission showed heavy purulence with intracellular gram-positive cocci, gram-positive bacilli (some of which were beaded), and yeast.
1) Medial to the mass, exfoliated epithelium, purulence, and hypertrophic granulation tissue were encountered and removed.
Patients participating in the London COPD study recorded peak flow readings and various symptoms including major (dyspnea, sputum purulence, and sputum volume) and minor (nasal discharge /congestion, wheeze, sore throat, and cough) symptoms - on a daily basis.
These should be prescribed when there is evidence of a severe exacerbation (as evidenced by the 3 cardinal symptoms of increased sputum volume, sputum purulence and increased dyspnoea) or in those who require ventilation (Evidence B).