pus

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pus,

thick white or yellowish fluid that forms in areas of infection such as wounds and abscesses. It is constituted of decomposed body tissue, bacteria (or other micro-organisms that cause the infection), and certain white blood cells. These white cells form one of the defense mechanisms of the body. Known as phagocytes, they rush to the area of infection and engulf the invading bacteria in a process called phagocytosis. Many white cells themselves succumb in the process and become one of the constituents of pus.

pus

[pəs]
(medicine)
A viscous, creamy, pale-yellow or yellow-green fluid produced by liquefaction necrosis in a neutrophil-rich exudate.

pus

the yellow or greenish fluid product of inflammation, composed largely of dead leucocytes, exuded plasma, and liquefied tissue cells
References in periodicals archive ?
Classification Duration Strong History Acute Up to 4 weeks >2 major factors,1 major factor with 2 minor factors or nasal purulence on examination Sub acute 4-12 weeks Same Recurrent acute >4 episodes per Same year, with each episode lasting 7- 10 days with absence of intervening signs and symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis Chronic >12 weeks Same rhinosinusitis Classification Included in differential Acute 1 major factor or >2 minor factors Sub acute Same Recurrent acute Same Chronic Same rhinosinusitis Acute On chronic: sudden worsening chronic rhinosinusitis with return to the base line after treatment.
That recommendation still applies to multifilament, microporous grafts that present with inflammatory infiltrates, granulation tissue, and purulence.
Ninety percent of patients had complete relief in sputum purulence, 10% had putty colored sputum.
Transthoracal drainage of cyst under thoracoscopy and roentgenoscopy control in purulence of echinococcus cyst was made in 12 patients: drainage of cavities under thoracoscopic control--in 7 (58.
However, closure of such wounds may lead to recurrence and referral of a patient to physical therapy for debridement due to the persistence of purulence or necrosis.
In UPLIFT[R], an exacerbation was defined as "an increase or new onset of more than one of the following respiratory symptoms (cough, sputum, sputum purulence, wheezing, dyspnea) with a duration of three or more days, requiring treatment with an antibiotic and/or systemic (oral, intramuscular or intravenous) steroid" [16].
The purulence and odor gave the doctor the impression that the patient had an infection superimposed over the gout.
The symptoms include increased breathlessness, sputum purulence or increased sputum volume and in some patients these are accompanied by other problems such as increasing cough, wheeze, chest tightness or fatigue.
A clinical pulmonary infection score, a weighted scale with high sensitivity and specificity, awards points for fever, leukocyte count, quantity and purulence of secretions, oxygenation, type of radiographic abnormality, and sputum Gram stain results (Davis, 2006).
Purulence was beginning; the draining gash in the side streamed sluggishly, drenching the thigh with blood like some thickened blackberry juice; a milky pinkish discharge, like a gray Moselle wine, seeped from the chest and spattered the belly beneath which the grimy loin-cloth rippled.
5 weeks, clinical signs of superinfection in terms of inflammation and purulence were markedly reduced.
The CDC Guidelines (2002) describe an exit site infection as inflammation around the insertion site that consists of erythema, warmth, tenderness, induration, or purulence within 2 centimeters (cm) of the skin at the exit site of the catheter.