push moraine

push moraine

[′pu̇sh mə‚rān]
(geology)
A broad, smooth, arc-shaped ridge consisting of material mechanically pushed or shoved along by an advancing glacier. Also known as push-ridge moraine; shoved moraine; thrust moraine; upsetted moraine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have posed several hypotheses about the structure (push moraine, large sedimentary bedrock erratics, horst, fold or diapir) and origin (glaciotectonic, glaciostatic or tectonic) of the Vaivara Sinimaed.
3B) that the Vaivara Sinimaed cannot be considered as a classical push moraine. The glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine landforms were probably formed near the margin of the glacier.
1971; Malakhovskij & Sammet 1982; Rattas & Kalm 2004; Suuroja 2005, 2006) have supported the glacial origin of the Vaivara Sinimaed, mostly interpreting them as push moraines. However, in the course of geological mapping Stumbur (1959) discovered several uplifts of Cambrian claystone (Sinimaed included).
Work on Thompson Glacier focused on its push moraine (Kalin, 1971; Moisan and Pollard, 1992, 1995).
Thompson Glacier, on the other hand, ended in a steep cliff, fronted by a distinctive push moraine, a characteristic feature of advancing Arctic glaciers (Evans and England, 1991).
This probably means that its push moraine will cease to be active.