Shame

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Shame

 

the feeling experienced by a person when he has committed an immoral act or one demeaning to human dignity. The kinds of action that evoke a feeling of shame are determined by social and historical conditions and by evolving ethical norms. Shame is experienced as painful anxiety, dissatisfaction with one’s self, censure of one’s own behavior, and regret over one’s action. A person may feel ashamed over unworthy behavior on the part of others, especially of persons one is close to. Shame is also experienced when one recalls a humiliating act committed in the past. The feeling of shame may be accompanied by discernible somatic symptoms, such as blushing or a lowering of the eyes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Of course I was put to shame by awards host Elin Fflur, who introduced the awards and kept the audience engaged while flitting effortlessly between Welsh and English.
"He's an American kid and we came from the streets," said Singh with a flashiness that put to shame the gigantic chandeliers hanging at our meeting point, Dubai's Cavalli Club.
Perhaps she's worried about being put to shame by the seals.
During a press-conference he put to shame those who are threatening that they will make public part of his meeting with
They should be put to shame by her stand but no doubt won't be.
London, Oct 13 ( ANI ): Jennifer Aniston's giant diamond engagement ring has been put to shame by the four-hundred-year-old Archduke Joseph diamond, which is expected to sell for 15 million dollars at an auction on November 13 in Geneva.
His performance against England was outstanding and put to shame a few of those wearing white.
An onlooker said: "He put to shame men on the beach half his age.
The conspiracy theorists are put to shame, when actually they were right the whole time.
He finds Washington's theology "predictably meager," but Lincoln's exploration of the nature of providence put to shame even the leading religious thinkers of his day.
Veterans Echo and the Bunnymen appear to have found some sort of elixir of youth - the fortysomethings put to shame bands half their ages, rampaging through their glittering back catalogue with the gritty edge they're known for.