put

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Put,

variant of PhutPhut
, in the Bible, son of Ham and eponym of an African people. It may also be a region, possibly Punt or Libya, and is perhaps the same as Pul (2.) It also appears as Put.
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Put’

 

the name of certain administrative units, under the jurisdiction of court officials serving the Russian princes. They existed from the 14th to the first half of the 16th century.

The puti supplied the court with various products. There were puti administered by the master of the stables (in charge of the prince’s horses, herds, and pastures), the hunt master (hunting), the falconer (falconry), the master of the table (fishing, orchards, and vegetable gardens), and the master of the cup (beekeeping). These officials, also known as putnye boyars, supervised servants living in the villages of the puti: falconers, gyr-falconers, beaver hunters, wild-hive beekeepers, vegetable and fruit gardeners, and so forth.

The Russian puti are comparable to the Mongol darugi, called dorogi in Russian sources. Although the puti were abolished about the middle of the 16th century, the term was occasionally used until the 17th century.

put

[pu̇t]
(computer science)
A programming instruction that causes data to be written from computer storage into a file.

put

Athletics a throw or cast, esp in putting the shot

put

In programming, a request to store the current record in an output file. Contrast with get.
References in periodicals archive ?
For everyone who ever thinks wistfully about turning back the clock, can I just say that putting the clocks back at the end of British Summer Time - as we do tonight - makes this, for me, one of the most hateful weekends of the year.
NOT putting the clocks back (keeping to Summer Time all year) was tried in the 1960s and was so unpopular that it was abandoned after just two years.
Not putting the clocks back but still putting them forward in the spring would increase daylight hours and encourage more outdoor activity, a report in the British Medical Journal suggests.
Jessica Alexander from The Sleep Council said putting the clocks back an hour ensures many of us in need of sleep could catch up a little.
Putting the clocks back an hour also hits most of us in the pocket, with extra power needed to light homes and offices.
It means the start of all those gloomy, winter nights and the familiar call for the practice of putting the clocks back to be stopped.

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