pylon


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pylon

1. a large vertical steel tower-like structure supporting high-tension electrical cables
2. a post or tower for guiding pilots or marking a turning point in a race
3. a streamlined aircraft structure for attaching an engine pod, external fuel tank, etc., to the main body of the aircraft
4. a monumental gateway, such as one at the entrance to an ancient Egyptian temple
5. a temporary artificial leg

Pylon

 

(1) A rectangular, truncated, pyramidal tower. In ancient Egyptian architecture, pylons flanked the narrow entrance of a temple. Such structures have been known since the Middle Kingdom, roughly from 2050 to 1700 B.C.

(2) A heavy pier used to support flat or arched roofs (for example, the roofs of subway stations).

(3) A massive low pier used to flank the entrance way to a palace terrace or park. Such pylons were widely used in classical architecture.

pylon

[′pī‚län]
(aerospace engineering)
A suspension device externally installed under the wing or fuselage of an aircraft; it is aerodynamically designed to fit the configuration of specific aircraft, thereby creating an insignificant amount of drag; it includes means of attaching to accommodate fuel tanks, bombs, rockets, torpedoes, rocket motors, or the like.
(civil engineering)
A massive structure, such as a truncated pyramid, on either side of an entrance.
A tower supporting a wire over a long span.
A tower or other structure marking a route for an airplane.

pylon

pylon, 1
1. Monumental gateway to an Egyptian temple, consisting of a pair of tower structures with slanting walls flanking the entrance portal.
2. In modern usage, a tower-like structure, as the steel supports for electrical high-tension

pylon

pylonclick for a larger image
An underwing pylon for use on combat aircraft.
i. The structure that holds a pod or an engine nacelle to the wing or fuselage.
ii. Towerlike structures that make turning points in an air race or ground reference maneuver.
References in periodicals archive ?
For large targets, a pylon will be able to carry HELLFIRE or Spike air-to-ground missile launchers.
Everything was going relatively well until the examiner asked him to perform the eights on pylons maneuver.
The towering pylons carry 132,000 vaults and stretch just over two and a half miles in Clifton, The towers when it was countryside running towards the location of the old power station at Agecroft.
That tower is the tallest of the bridge's pylons at 125m high - slightly shorter than the 138m Radio City Tower.
Around 36,900 homes were left without power, as the electricity provider worked to divert power from the Killingworth pylons via alternative routes.
A spokeswoman for Northern Powergrid, the company responsible for managing the region's electricity network, said: "After receiving a call from the police alerting us to someone climbing one of our electricity towers (pylons) in the Killingworth area, we isolated electricity supplies in the area so police could safely deal with the incident.
"I can only imagine how he would be with pylons, the noise off those things will blow his head off."
Like Paddy, the Irish Mirror is campaigning against Eirgrid's project to erect up to 1,500 gigantic pylons as tall as 60m across 700km of Ireland in a [euro]3.2billion network upgrade.
CAIRO - Three small bombs exploded on Sunday in a western Cairo suburb, targeting an electricity transmission pylon and cutting power to the area for nearly an hour, a security official said.Militants have stepped up attacks in Egypt, mostly against the security forces, since the army ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July 2013 and the new authorities launched a deadly crackdown on his supporters."Three bombs planted near an electricity transmission pylon...
(NYSE: SPR) said it has rolled out the first flight test pylon for the Mitsubishi regional jet aircraft.
Modelling shows that in some cases the Cross-arms can increase the power-carrying capability of a pylon by up to 2.5 times.
Probably the first British painter to recognise the significance of the pylon was the Catholic Cambridge dropout Tristram Hillier (1905-83), whose Pylons (1933; Fig.