Granuloma

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granuloma

[‚gran·yə′lō·mə]
(medicine)
A discrete nodular lesion of inflammatory tissue in which granulation is significant.

Granuloma

 

a focal growth of inflammatory origin in the cells of young connective tissue in the form of a small node.

Granuloma develops in connection with various (most often infectious) processes (tuberculosis, syphilis, leprosy, brucellosis, tularemia, actinomycosis), with collagenic diseases (such as rheumatism), and at the sites of entry of foreign bodies. Certain granulomas have more specific names, such as the tubercle in tuberculosis and the gumma in syphilis.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although the exact pathogenesis of pyogenic granuloma is not clearly established, the lesion has been hypothesized to be a reactive process followed by an impaired wound healing response.
Yam et al [9] proposed that pyogenic granuloma expressed significantly more VEGF and b FGF than healthy gingiva and periodontium.
Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is also called lobular capillary hemangioma by some authors (1).
Clinically, the surface of a pyogenic granuloma may appear smooth or lobulated, and a progression in color from pink to red to purple occurs over time.
A case of giant nasal pyogenic granuloma gravidarum.
Lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH), also referred to as pyogenic granuloma, is relatively common in the nasal cavity, accounting for nearly one-third of upper aerodigestive tract LCHs.
Three cases of pyogenic granuloma and 1 case of hemangioma resulted in oral-cavity bleeding.
Pyogenic granuloma or capillary hemangioma, which pyogenic granuloma resembles, shows a lobular configuration of granulation tissue sprinkled with inflammatory cells and sprouting capillaries grouped around a parent vessel; these features were not seen in this case.
Clinically, this lesion can be misdiagnosed as mucocele, hemangioma, Kaposi sarcoma, angiosarcoma, pyogenic granuloma, and several other lesions.
A biopsy was performed and the diagnosis rendered was a pyogenic granuloma.
A larynx contact ulcer, also known as a pyogenic granuloma, is a benign lesion that is most common among adult men.