quantum cryptography


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

quantum cryptography

An encryption method that can detect eavesdropping. Using optical transmission to send a secret key to the other side, quantum cryptography draws on the inherent properties of photons, which become slightly altered if they are observed by an intruder. When an alteration is detected, the receiver knows the sender's key has been compromised. See cryptography.

Polarized and Entangled Photons
One method relies on the polarization of the photons, which will be altered if observed (see QKD). Another method uses photon pairs that exhibit a correlation between them. Any observation along the way weakens the correlation, which can be detected.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantum cryptography stems from the concept of quantum money, which was proposed by Wiesner in 1969.
The quantum cryptography explained above offers secure key distribution based on physical laws.
Quantum cryptography is also well known as quantum key distribution (QKD).
Pivk, Applied Quantum Cryptography. Lectures Notes in Physics, vol.
China is among a growing number of countries seeking to unlock the science of quantum cryptography and computing, which many experts believe will one day revolutionize computerized security.
Vaidman, "Quantum cryptography based on orthogonal states," Physical Review Letters, vol.
In Section 1, we briefly review classical cryptography and quantum cryptography. Section 2 discusses the quantum shift register and how to generate a matrix code used in the Diffie-Hellman algorithm to match the key between Alice and Bob to be used later in the Hill cipher algorithm [1] and then generate another matrix code used as a one-time pad (OTP).
However, a theoretical physicist Karl Svozil disagrees that the protocol is entirely secure and said that the protocol required the classical channel to be uncompromised for quantum cryptography to work adding that the newly proposed protocol is 'breakable' by middlemen attacks.
Polarization properties of quantum light propagation through the turbulent atmosphere are required in the context of implementations of quantum cryptography for communication channels between earth-based stations and between satellites and earth-based stations.
This nonlocal nature of entanglement has also been identified as an essential resource for many novel tasks such as quantum computation, quantum teleportation [2], superdense coding [3], quantum cryptography [4, 5], and more recently, one-way quantum computation [6], and quantum metrology [7].
Summary: London: Researchers have come up with a way of protecting telecoms networks using quantum cryptography ...
Quantum cryptography relies on the rules of quantum theory to generate uncrackable codes that encrypt data in a way that reveals if it has been eavesdropped or tampered with.