quantum discontinuity

quantum discontinuity

[′kwän·təm ‚dis‚känt·ən′ü·əd·ē]
(quantum mechanics)
The emission or absorption of a definite amount of energy that accompanies a quantum jump.
References in periodicals archive ?
S., [Black-Body Theory and the Quantum Discontinuity 1894-1912], Oxford University Press, 235-264 (1978).
The topics include the genesis of wave mechanics, Schrodinger's cat and her laboratory cousins, digital and open system quantum simulation with trapped ions, the Bohr-Schrodinger dialogue on quantum discontinuity, and a few reasons why Louis de Broglie discovered Broglie's waves yet did not discover Schrodinger's equation.
Interaction of information begins with quantum particle/wave only at the points of (i) quantum discontinuity and (ii) quantum void.
The nature subtler than what is measured in Planck's scale could be reached by penetrating through 'quantum discontinuity' or 'quantum void'.
While macroscopic classical nest (Nest I) somehow, at some point of scale, transits into microscopic quantum nest (Nest II), it is logical to infer that penetrating through quantum discontinuity or quantum void, microscopic quantum domain communicates with submicroscopic subquantum nest of nature (nest III) for elementary phenomenology, which includes de-conditioning and reconditioning of existential properties.