quantum dot laser


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quantum dot laser

[¦kwän·təm ′dät ‚lä·zər]
(optics)
A laser that has a dense array of equal-sized quantum dots in the active region, each with only a few thousand atoms of semiconductor material, and emits light from electronic transitions between the discrete energy levels of these quantum dots.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to make quantum dot lasers that can switch between emitting light from only the cores or only the shells, the researchers designed a special laser cavity, which is the central part of the laser responsible for confining and reflecting light until it becomes highly coherent.
The resulting lasers exhibit very high cavity quality factors-almost an order of magnitude higher than those of typical quantum dot lasers, which usually have random cavities.
Fouckhardt, "Generation of dense lying Ga(As)Sb quantum dots for efficient quantum dot lasers," Advanced Materials Research, vol.
In this paper, first, we describe QD laser analyzing theory based on the multi population rate equations model and consider the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening of the optical gain for solving InAs/InP self-assembled quantum dot laser (SAQD-LD) rate equations numerically using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.
To date, quantum dot lasers have been made only in infrared wavelengths.
Although infrared quantum dot lasers have been made before, the Canadian team tackled the "much more difficult" task of pushing the laser energy into the red part of the visible spectrum.
and Deputy General Manager of the Nanotechnology Research Center of Fujitsu Laboratories, Ltd., said, "I feel honored that the quantum dot laser technology developed by Fujitsu Laboratories and the University of Tokyo, and supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan, has won this prestigious award.
Quantum dot lasers, which use this technology, are revolutionary lasers that are significantly superior to conventional semiconductor lasers in that they feature higher performance in such aspects as temperature-independent operation, low power consumption, long-distance transmission, and high speed.
In another AFOSR-funded project, Bhattacharya is exploring the possibility of growing quantum dot lasers directly on silicon, allowing scientists to use light instead of charge to route information on chips.
Zhukov et al., "High performance quantum dot lasers on GaAs substrates operating in 1.5 [micro]m range," Electronics Letters, vol.
The nonlinear optical properties of QD have the potential for device application such as infrared photo detectors, quantum dot lasers, high-speed electro-optical modulators, light emitting diodes, one electron transistors, optical memory technology and other extensive applications in optic communication.