quantum measurement paradox

quantum measurement paradox

[¦kwänt·əm ′mezh·ə·mənt ‚par·ə‚däks]
(quantum mechanics)
A paradox that arises because, at the atomic level where the quantum formalism has been directly tested, the most natural interpretation implies that when two or more different outcomes are possible it is not necessarily true that one or the other is actually realized, whereas at the everyday level such a state of affairs seems to conflict with direct experience.
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Leggett of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as he puts the point on it: "The quantum measurement paradox is no longer a matter of 'theology.
Leggett's opening remark could sum up the discussion: "The quantum measurement paradox [in which these questions of superposition and duality play a prominent role] is no longer a matter of 'theology.