quantum size effects

quantum size effects

[¦kwänt·əm ′sīz i‚feks]
(solid-state physics)
Unusual properties of extremely small crystals that arise from confinement of electrons to small regions of space in one, two, or three dimensions.
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This is called Quantum Size Effects, or QSE, and a consequence of this relationship is that certain film thicknesses are more stable than others," explains Tringides.
Researchers Phaedon Avouris and In-Whan Lyo report in the May 13 SCIENCE that tiny, naturally formed terraces on metal surfaces trap electrons and that these electrons exhibit quantum size effects.
To see quantum size effects, says Avouris, scientists must look at materials on approximately the same scale as the electron wavelengths.
If the terraces are small enough -- as they are on these metal surfaces -- the energy levels of the trapped electrons are so far apart that even the jiggling effects of thermal radiation can't prevent the quantum size effects from being detected at room temperature.
8 Limitations of Mies Theory Size and Quantum Size Effects in Very Small Nanoparticles.

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