quantum wire


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quantum wire

[′kwän·təm ′wīr]
(electronics)
A strip of conducting material about 10 nanometers or less in width and thickness that displays quantum-mechanical effects such as the Aharanov-Bohm effect and universal conductance fluctuations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Fokker-Planck equation of a disordered Andreev quantum wire of length L, with N open scattering channels and localization length [xi], is given by [11]
We have presented a theoretical approach of the effects of an intense laser beam on a neutral donor impurity located in a quantum well, which is also within quantum wire with semiconductor materials of low dimensionality.
[M.sub.fi] = 2<[[psi].sub.f] [absolute value of (er)] [[psi].sub.i]> is the electric dipole moment of the transition from i state to f state in the quantum wire. The matrix element is important for the calculation of different optical properties of the system related to the electronic transitions.
Other attempts at making quantum wire lasers have started with an optical material that is etched down to quantum sizes.
The charge patterns drain the sheet of electrons below to form quantum wires and dots.
Two dimension quantum wells (confined in one dimension) (3) and one dimension quantum wires (4-6) (confinement in two dimensions) also exhibit quantum size effect, each with its own ramifications.
It also explores new fields of research that include surface plasmonics and micro-ring resonators and the theory of optical gain and absorption in quantum dots and quantum wires and their uses in semiconductor lasers.
After light or electrical current excites electrons in these 1- to 5-nonometer-thick "quantum wires," these "confined" electrons can calm down again only by emitting light.
These small, in effect one-dimensional structures -- called "quantum wires" -- then facilitate the electron-hole recombination by confining the electron's movement, they suggested.
The tubes appear to conduct electricity as coherent quantum wires over very long distances even at room temperature.
Another challenge, says Harris, is to probe single objects in the 100 to 200 |Angstrong~ range: quantum wires and dots.
Canham believes that his silicon filaments may act like "quantum wires." Others relate the light to "quantum dots."

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