quasi-stationary front

quasi-stationary front

[¦kwä·zē ′stā·shə‚ner·ē ′frənt]
(meteorology)
A front which is stationary or nearly so; conventionally, a front which is moving at a speed less than about 5 knots (0.26 meter per second) is generally considered to be quasi-stationary. Commonly known as stationary front.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

quasi-stationary front

A weather front that moves at a speed of less than five knots. Commonly known as a stationary front.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
A quasi-stationary front, depicted in the map below, developed at the northern margin of the tropical airmass and triggered convective activity from the Central Plains to the Mid-Atlantic.
The pressure field is too weak for a meaningful isobar chart, but observing the temperature field and hand-drawing the front (as shown) reveals the definite presence of a quasi-stationary front extending from northern Florida to Louisiana.
A quasi-stationary front in the Midwest, associated with the jet stream, served as a significant trigger for heavy rain and severe weather as it oscillated north and south through northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin.