quassia


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Related to quassia: Quassia amara

quassia

(kwŏsh`ə), name for several tropical trees and for a bitter extract from their bark. The extract containing complex terpenoid compounds called quassinoids is used medicinally as a bitter tonic and a pinworm remedy; it is also used in insecticides, e.g., in flypaper and against aphids. Surinam quassia comes from the tree Quassia amara of N Brazil and surrounding regions; Jamaica quassia comes from Picrasma excelsa of the West Indies. Some Old World quassia species are similarly used. The trees are related to the ailanthus. Quassia is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Simaroubaceae.

quassia

1. the bark and wood of Quassia amara and of a related tree, Picrasma excelsa, used in furniture making
2. a bitter compound extracted from this bark and wood, formerly used as a tonic and anthelmintic, now used in insecticides
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References in periodicals archive ?
Actividad gastrointestinal del extracto acuoso bruto de Quassia amara (simarubaceae).
In a quart of wine soak for two days five grammes of juniper berries,15grammes of Calisaia (akind of Peruvian bark)and 15 bitter quassia (whatever they are).
It was made of white wine, Spirits, Grape Syrup, Hickory nut infusion, Quassia, Walnut infusion and Bitter aloes, the proportions I could not tell to save my life.
The lower understory is dominated by Oxandra longipetala, Quassia ainara, Sorocea affinis, Alseis blackiana, Cupania sylvatica, Protium panamense, Poulsenia armata, and Oenocarpus mapora.
Roles of nectar robbers in the reproduction of the tropical treelet Quassia amara (Simaroubaceae).
Quassia Bark is ground and soaked and the elixir sprayed on trees to act as an effective deterrent against soft-bodied pests--but is harmless to hard-bodied predatory "good" bugs.
Root bark of Quassia Africana, a year-round flowering shrub of the lowland rainforest, provides a traditional medicine for bronchial pneumonia.