quench bath

quench bath

[′kwench ‚bath]
(engineering)
A liquid medium, such as oil, fused salt, or water, into which a material is plunged for heat-treatment purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The phase diagram was for an operating temperature of 50[degrees]C since this was the planned quench bath temperature.
As the jet of spin dope enters the quench bath, non-solvent diffuses into the dope, causing it to transition across the binodal line (shown by the dotted arrow) and the polymer to precipitate.
When temperatures in a quench bath rose to 35[degrees]C for one engineering company it meant production targets were under threat.
This immediately began lowering temperature in the quench bath, taking it from 35[degrees]C to just 8[degrees]C, allowing the engineering company to resume normal activity and put production schedules back on track.
The delay time from solution bath to quench bath should be less than 20 seconds.
Besides imparting the desired thickness and smoothness, the steel belt also forms a solidified skin layer on the sheet before it enters the quench bath. The steel belt is maintained at the proper quench temperature by its contact with the main driving roll.
Since PEG is relatively nonvolatile in the processing temperature range used in this study, and the quench bath is not a solvent for PEG, the quenched gel-fiber retained most of the spin-solvent.
Quench rates of the part exposed to a 150F (60C) water quench bath were around 122F/second (50C/second) for the casting's outer areas and 50F/second (10C/second) for the inner areas.
1, both porosity and average pore size increased with TEP content increasing in the quench bath. The ratios of TEP to water from 0 to 25 wt% had little effect on porosity and average pore size for hollow fiber membranes, but a great effect above 40 wt%.
* Quench Rate and Temperature: The delay time from solution bath to quench bath should be less than 20 seconds.
However, the heavy end of e sample must be immersed in the quench bath first to prevent cracking of the specimen's apex.