quench temperature

quench temperature

[′kwench ‚tem·prə·chər]
(engineering)
The temperature of the medium used for quenching.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Yao, Numerical Simulation of Quench Temperature Field and Internal Stress Field of Aluminum Alloy 7050 Thick Plate, Central South University, Changsha, China, 2007.
Thirty samples (15 for each quench temperature) were quenched and sectioned without thermal exposure in order to determine the natural variation of the baseline level of residual stress; the elastic strain measurements for these baseline samples are presented in Figure 7.
A similar trend occurs for exposure temperature at 200[degrees]C (Figure 9), wherein the samples exposed with higher states of initial stress, corresponding to the higher quench temperature, experience relaxation faster than those with lower states of initial stress.
* Quench temperature: In general, the colder the better, unless the part geometry makes it subject to distortion.
On the other hand, foaming time and quench temperature are supporting parameters for foam growth.
A thermocouple was installed to measure quench temperature, but several factors eliminated that approach for rod-end temperature.
Output of the two IR thermometers, quench temperature, and track speed are all recorded for future analysis.
For comparison the difference between initial quench temperature and [T.sub.g] and the stress-optical coefficient in the rubbery state are included in the table.
The same final quench temperature, [T.sub.f], was use for each blend, although a downward shift of 2 [degrees] C was observed in the cloud point temperature upon addition of the block copolymer.
To obtain good properties in ADI, the casting must be fully austenitized and to quench temperature, the single most important parameter in determining the mechanical properties of ADI, must be carefully controlled.
where [B.sub.i] = hH/k is the Blot number, H is the half thickness of the sample, [T.sub.q] is the quench temperature, and h is the heat transfer coefficient between the sample and the quench medium.
If low quench temperatures are used, then a small amount of martensite may be present with the ausferrite.