quenching


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quenching

[′kwench·iŋ]
(atomic physics)
Phenomenon in which a very strong electric field, such as a crystal field, causes the orbit of an electron in an atom to precess rapidly so that the average magnetic moment associated with its orbital angular momentum is reduced to zero.
(electronics)
The process of terminating a discharge in a gas-filled radiation-counter tube by inhibiting reignition.
Reduction of the intensity of resonance radiation resulting from deexcitation of atoms, which would otherwise have emitted this radiation, in collisions with electrons or other atoms in a gas.
(engineering)
Shock cooling by immersing liquid or molten material into a cooling medium (liquid or gas); used in metallurgy, plastics forming, and petroleum refining.
(immunology)
An adaptation of immunofluorescence that uses two fluorochromes, one of which absorbs light emitted by the other; one fluorochrome labels that antigen, another the antibody, and the antigen-antibody complexes retain both; the initially emitted light is absorbed and so quenched by the second compound.
(mechanical engineering)
Rapid removal of excess heat from the combustion chamber of an automotive engine.
(solid-state physics)
Reduction in the intensity of sensitized luminescence radiation when energy migrating through a crystal by resonant transfer is dissipated in crystal defects or impurities rather than being reemitted as radiation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where F0 was the fluorescence peak intensity of [alpha]-glucosidase, F was the fluorescence peak intensity of [alpha]-glucosidase in the presence of phloridzin, Kq was the quenching constant, T0 was the average life span of tryptophan of the enzyme (T0 =10-8 s), and [Q] was the concentration of phloridzin.
Heat transfer during quenching occurs via all possible heat transfer mechanisms, that is, conduction, convection, and radiation.
where j = l, l + 1, l + 2, ..., then the solution vector sequence [u.sup.(l)], [u.sup.(l+1)], [u.sup.(l+2)], ..., produced by the adaptive, or semi-adaptive, scheme (2.12), (2.13) increases monotonically until unity is exceeded by a component of the vector (that is, until quenching occurs) or converges to the steady solution of the problem.
"The situation becomes more complex when we realize that all these mechanisms may depend on properties of galaxies being quenched, they may evolve with time, they act at different time-scales -- fast or slow -- and they may depend on the properties of the quenching factors as well," Darvish said.
In general, numerical methods require two models in order to predict the thermal residual stress from quenching process.
In the present work, the 3D finite element method based on ANSYS is developed and used to simulate the online quenching processes.
Shorter fluorescence lifetimes were observed in the presence of 1 that indicates some kind of dynamic quenching effect between the anthracene and 1.
While the flameball temperature of a dust explosion can easily reach 500[degrees]C/ 932[degrees]F, the quenching module typically remains below 100[degrees]C/212[degrees]F, followed by rapid cool down due to its large surface area.
Fluorescence quenching of fluorophore molecules by electron deficient molecules were extensively studied in organic solutions (2), (3), (4).
Quenching reduces the temperature of the pasta, rice or vegetables down to 110 to 120 F, capturing 45 to 50 percent of the cooked product's heat energy in the quench water.