quiddity

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quiddity

Philosophy the essential nature of something
References in periodicals archive ?
Its cognitive power remains unchanged because it is not limited to material quiddities.
It launched in the first issue of 1997, under the moniker "Quiddities" ("the essence of a thing," per the dictionary definition).
Quite sensibly, they did not attempt to override the climate or turn its quiddities into a game: instead, they imported what they needed to supplement or extend each season's food.
Even during the mid-1820s, 'the subjects of permissible laughter were being limited'; by the 1830s, cartoons were commonly being directed at safer targets--'at the amusing quiddities of children or servants, at the gaucheries of the nouveaux riches, the charming innocence of nice young women'.
editorial intervention, or compositors' quiddities," Read intones, "can completely explain away either the moment of transcription or the fact that that moment is rarely, if ever, accidental" (9).
(7.) Not in the sense of their perceptual-significative (semiotic) qualities and resemblances, but because these are themselves the quiddities of a dynamic substantial continuity and identity between these different things.
Andersen might have cited the razing of the old Nickodell's outside the gates of Paramount, the metastasis of strip malls all over the city, the simulacrum effect of the cleaned-up Hollywood Boulevard, the mall-ification of the once blessedly fallow real estate around the now-shrunken Farmer's Market, and the transformation of so many of the city's quiddities into Disneyfied tourist traps; alternatively, he could have highlighted the venerable landmarks that remain--like Boardner's bar, Musso & Frank's, H.M.S.
Summarizing Cristina Malcomson (Heart-Work [1999] 30), Beecher notes that "charactery belongs to an historical moment between feudalism and individualism when the quiddities of personhood were classified according to the socially constructed desires that motivated them, whether toward openly mercantile or toward deviously ambitious ends,...
He occasionally quarrelled with his fellow justices over what he described as the 'quirks and quiddities' of the law.
The present day teems with new discoveries in Fact, which are greater, as regards the soul and prospect of men, than all the disquisitions and quiddities of the Schoolmen.
Eloquent man of the Left though Lynd could be, his essays are squarely in the form's English mainstream, and relish in if not a clubman's then at least a clubbable voice the quirks and quiddities of the quotidien (titles include, "Railway Stations I Have Loved" and "In and Out of Bed").
Whereas in the great soliloquy he felt almost paralysed by thoughts of "the law's delay/ [and] The insolence of office" (3.1.72-73), now, facing the reality of death, he laughs at the absurdities of lawyers: "Where be his quiddities now, his quillets, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks?