quillwort


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quillwort,

common name for several species of the plant genus Isoetes, which grow in ponds, slow streams, and swampy places. See LycopodiophytaLycopodiophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of the organisms commonly called club mosses and quillworts. As in other vascular plants, the sporophyte, or spore-producing phase, is the conspicuous generation, and the gametophyte, or gamete-producing phase, is minute.
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quillwort

[′kwil‚wȯrt]
(botany)
The common name for plants of the genus Isoetes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Br., Appalachian Quillwort; Engelmann's Quillwort.* xS3
melanopoda Gray & Durieu, Blackfoot Quillwort.* S1?
piedmontana (Pfeiffer) Reed, Piedmont Quillwort.* S2
The divisions covered in this work are Equisetophyta and Lycopodiophyta, which include horsetails, scouring-rushes, quillworts, club-mosses, and spike-mosses.
This is the reason underlying the strategy of, for example, the quillworts (Isoetes), which fix carbon dioxide at night in the form of organic acids for use in photosynthesis during the day.
Number of leaves per rosette and fertility characters of the quillwort (Isoetes lacustris L.) in 50 lakes of Europe: A field study.
Photosynthesis in quillworts, or, Why are some aquatic plants similar to cacti?
Publication of the treatment of the genus Isoetes for Flora of North America (Taylor et al., 1993) stimulated extensive research in eastern North America on the distribution and taxonomy of quillworts. As a result, at least 10 new taxa of quillworts have been published since 1993.
Data presented are limited to descriptions of ornamentation types in a randomly selected group of quillworts, with most taxa from North America.
Bill Dickison was the first person to introduce me to the complexities of quillworts and to develop my appreciation of the diversity of form and structure in plants.