quinacrine


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Related to quinacrine: mepacrine

quinacrine

[′kwin·ə·krən]
(pharmacology)
C23H30ClN3O Formerly an important antimalarial drug but now used in the treatment of giardiasis, tapeworm infections, amebiasis, and a variety of other conditions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quinacrine shows a 100% clearance rate in refractory giardiasis after treatment with metronidazole, tinidazole, and nitromidazole has failed.
Quinacrine does come with a major concern of its own: the risk of aplastic anemia.
The interaction of quinacrine with adenine nucleotides.
Malaria disappeared after 3-5 years without additional measures beyond occasional quinacrine use in areas where An.
These drugs could be divided into two main types: acridines, which include mepacrine (quinacrine), used since 1930, and quinoleines, which include chloroquine (amodiaquine), proguanil, chlorproguanil, pyrimethamine, primaquine, quinocide, pamaquine.
According to the companies, Curaxins include CBL0137, which is a carbazole, and CBL0102, which is a quinacrine.
Severe starvation medium was supplemented with protease inhibitors, 1mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, 10 [micro]g [mL.sup.-1] leupeptin, 100 [micro]M E64-d, and 10 mM quinacrine. The medium was adjusted to pH 7.0 by adding KOH.
The "protector" effect has also been reported with respect to the aromatic mutagen quinacrine, ICR-191, ICR-170, IQ-type heterocyclic aromatic amines, and neocarzinostatin in the presence of caffeine and its derivatives [44-47].
[14] verified the effect of various anti-inflammatory agents as retinoic acid, quinacrine and dipyridamole in reducing adhesions in animals.
When quinacrine was added to the treatment regimen of the nonresponders, two-thirds experienced a lessening of their disease.