Quotation


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Related to Quotation: Quotation marks

quotation

1. Commerce a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
2. an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quotation

 

the determination of rates of exchange of foreign currencies, securities (stocks and bonds), or values of commodities on an exchange.

In capitalist countries the quotation service is generally carried out by a special body of a commodity, stock, or currency exchange (usually by a quotation commission); the quotations are published in exchange bulletins on wholesale prices for commodities, values of securities (stocks and bonds), and rates of exchange of foreign currencies. Only the securities of the limited number of joint-stock companies that control a major share of production in various sectors of the national economy are permitted to be quoted on the exchanges. For example, in the United States in the mid-1960’s, the securities of fewer than 0.1 percent of the total number of American corporations were quoted.

Rates of exchange of foreign currencies are established by state currency bodies. Black market exchange rates generally function side by side with the official currency rates. Two basic methods of quotation of foreign currency exist: direct and indirect. The more common is direct quotation, in which the unit of foreign currency is expressed in terms of national currency (for example, in mid-1973 in France US $1 equaled 4.6041 French francs). In indirect quotation, used mainly in Great Britain, the unit of national currency is expressed in terms of foreign currency (£1 equaled $2.58).

In the USSR, foreign currency rates are quoted by the Gos-bank (State Bank) of the USSR and are published monthly in a bulletin. Direct quotation is used.

M. IU. BORTNIK


Quotation

 

a literal excerpt from a written work. A quotation is an authoritative statement that most precisely expresses an idea that a writer wishes to support. Quotations are also used to criticize an idea cited and as valuable factual material to illustrate a point. They are found mostly in scholarly works (usually in the humanities) and official and business texts. They are either enclosed in quotation marks or italicized and are accompanied by a reference to the source.

Provided that the quoted author’s ideas are not distorted, it is permissible to modernize the spelling and punctuation and to omit a word or words, marking the omission by a series of dots (ellipsis points).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

quotation

A price quoted by a contractor, subcontractor, material supplier, or vendor to furnish materials, labor, or both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many introductory textbooks use quotations to introduce psychological concepts (e.g., Myers, 2007; Wade & Tavris, 2008).
I was a little surprised by the provenance of some of the quotations, such as the often-quoted remark about the reasons academic fights are so strident--because the stakes are so small.
The question is: does quotation, whether of the indirect quotation kind or of the pure quotation kind, really force the semanticist to give up at least one of compositionality or innocence?
When the form has been submitted, a quotation is delivered within 24 hours by email, and the user can complete the order if satisfied with the proposal.
The quotation that irked controversy reads, 'The nation which gave unnecessary latitude to women always regretted it one day'.
The highest average quotation of palay of P21.53 per kg was recorded during the middle of the lean season of 2014.
In American English, the comma or period comes before the quotation mark.
(15) And here is Chief Justice Roberts's quotation in Trinity Lutheran Church v.
This quotation's earliest print appearance may be in Matt Carson's (2007) libertarian novel, On a Hill They Call Capital [n'J: A Revolution Is Coming.
We drop a few balls each month--a comma here, a misplaced quotation mark there--but we manage to successfully juggle a myriad of others.
Charlotte Brewer says in The Oxford History of English Lexicography, "Today we take it for granted that a dictionary of quotations is as likely to be used as a source of a pithy and apposite quotation for a speech or presentation, as it is to offer us the attribution for such a quotation as used by someone else." (7) If this is indeed the case, why do such compilations often fail to provide references that would prove the veracity of attributed quotations?