Quotation

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quotation

1. Commerce a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
2. an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Quotation

 

the determination of rates of exchange of foreign currencies, securities (stocks and bonds), or values of commodities on an exchange.

In capitalist countries the quotation service is generally carried out by a special body of a commodity, stock, or currency exchange (usually by a quotation commission); the quotations are published in exchange bulletins on wholesale prices for commodities, values of securities (stocks and bonds), and rates of exchange of foreign currencies. Only the securities of the limited number of joint-stock companies that control a major share of production in various sectors of the national economy are permitted to be quoted on the exchanges. For example, in the United States in the mid-1960’s, the securities of fewer than 0.1 percent of the total number of American corporations were quoted.

Rates of exchange of foreign currencies are established by state currency bodies. Black market exchange rates generally function side by side with the official currency rates. Two basic methods of quotation of foreign currency exist: direct and indirect. The more common is direct quotation, in which the unit of foreign currency is expressed in terms of national currency (for example, in mid-1973 in France US $1 equaled 4.6041 French francs). In indirect quotation, used mainly in Great Britain, the unit of national currency is expressed in terms of foreign currency (£1 equaled $2.58).

In the USSR, foreign currency rates are quoted by the Gos-bank (State Bank) of the USSR and are published monthly in a bulletin. Direct quotation is used.

M. IU. BORTNIK


Quotation

 

a literal excerpt from a written work. A quotation is an authoritative statement that most precisely expresses an idea that a writer wishes to support. Quotations are also used to criticize an idea cited and as valuable factual material to illustrate a point. They are found mostly in scholarly works (usually in the humanities) and official and business texts. They are either enclosed in quotation marks or italicized and are accompanied by a reference to the source.

Provided that the quoted author’s ideas are not distorted, it is permissible to modernize the spelling and punctuation and to omit a word or words, marking the omission by a series of dots (ellipsis points).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

quotation

A price quoted by a contractor, subcontractor, material supplier, or vendor to furnish materials, labor, or both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our suggestion is that all the cases, despite these differences, are best understood as resulting from a metalinguistic operation whereby the expressive is interpreted as implicitly quotational. However, there are two important aspects to this operation that must be recognized.
From that point of view, it is tempting to compare this kind of lexical units with quotational compounds.
Alongside this ironic constellation of quotational narrative modes, the text contains a number of specific musical and literary intertexts.
the cold, the shabby, the hard, the sudden, the inanimate, the rigid, the confused, the joke, the excess, the dense, the dropping; the most general, unlayered, flat; the extraordinary, highly layered, highly charged; the loose, the tattered, the inordinate, nothing much, the perpetual, the always interrupted; shock and the ever-extending opposites; the simultaneous, the quotational; the noise." This collage of expressive images can be traced back to his studies under Johannes Itten and Paul Klee at the Bauhaus in the early 1920s.
The "formalist" and "quotational" positions noted here would suggest not, for its involvement in the works outside of a customary frame allow it to speak of universal humanism, be appreciated for its own self, or reflect the shared cultural dilemmas of the current age.
commonly omit quotational markings on mentioned expressions
In pressing the originality of his case, Briggs sets up (to knock down) quotational travesties of an array of previous critics.
His method is less analytical than quotational. He makes an exhaustive, sometimes exhausting, compilation of what various politicians, lawyers, judges, historians, and journalists have said and written about the Constitution.
Reported cash flow is A$2.2 million lower than outlined in the FY19 Preliminary Operating Results and FY20 Guidance released to the ASX on 10 July 2019 due to quotational period pricing adjustments for outstanding Mt Carlton concentrate shipments.
Many are inspired by Ovid's Metamorphoses and by several Titian pieces on the same theme, but formally and stylistically Ofili seems to be digging deeper and deeper into certain lesser-traveled tributaries of modernism: One catches glimpses of Toulouse-Lautrec, Beardsley, Munch, Chagall, Dufy, and Bonnard, as well as Romare Bearden and Eldzier Cortor, but there's nothing quotational or arch here.
(5) His argument is that the voices of narrators and characters emerge in a quotational context, audible only in their stylistic difference from each other, becoming functional via a dialogue between readers and a projected narrating instance.
Conservatives have all along lamented this quotational habit as a sign that artists could not affirm their culture's right to engender truth, and they tend to link it to multicultural disintegration; radicals saw it as a liberation, a sign that "history" was over.