Quotation

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quotation

1. Commerce a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
2. an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender

Quotation

 

the determination of rates of exchange of foreign currencies, securities (stocks and bonds), or values of commodities on an exchange.

In capitalist countries the quotation service is generally carried out by a special body of a commodity, stock, or currency exchange (usually by a quotation commission); the quotations are published in exchange bulletins on wholesale prices for commodities, values of securities (stocks and bonds), and rates of exchange of foreign currencies. Only the securities of the limited number of joint-stock companies that control a major share of production in various sectors of the national economy are permitted to be quoted on the exchanges. For example, in the United States in the mid-1960’s, the securities of fewer than 0.1 percent of the total number of American corporations were quoted.

Rates of exchange of foreign currencies are established by state currency bodies. Black market exchange rates generally function side by side with the official currency rates. Two basic methods of quotation of foreign currency exist: direct and indirect. The more common is direct quotation, in which the unit of foreign currency is expressed in terms of national currency (for example, in mid-1973 in France US $1 equaled 4.6041 French francs). In indirect quotation, used mainly in Great Britain, the unit of national currency is expressed in terms of foreign currency (£1 equaled $2.58).

In the USSR, foreign currency rates are quoted by the Gos-bank (State Bank) of the USSR and are published monthly in a bulletin. Direct quotation is used.

M. IU. BORTNIK


Quotation

 

a literal excerpt from a written work. A quotation is an authoritative statement that most precisely expresses an idea that a writer wishes to support. Quotations are also used to criticize an idea cited and as valuable factual material to illustrate a point. They are found mostly in scholarly works (usually in the humanities) and official and business texts. They are either enclosed in quotation marks or italicized and are accompanied by a reference to the source.

Provided that the quoted author’s ideas are not distorted, it is permissible to modernize the spelling and punctuation and to omit a word or words, marking the omission by a series of dots (ellipsis points).

quotation

A price quoted by a contractor, subcontractor, material supplier, or vendor to furnish materials, labor, or both.
References in classic literature ?
We have his words, which no one can deny; and shall we not quote them to the people, and prove to them what he was, and what he taught, and what he did?
Now, holy friar," quoth he, panting and wiping the sweat from his brow, "what say the Scriptures that you quote so glibly?
I have thought it proper to quote at length these interesting passages, because they contain a luminous abridgment of the principal arguments in favor of the Union, and must effectually remove the false impressions which a misapplication of other parts of the work was calculated to make.
In order to convey fully the ideas with which his experience had impressed him on this subject, it will be necessary to quote a passage of some length from his very interesting Notes on the State of Virginia, p.
Is not this -- if I might quote my Lord's own words -- "strictly according to Analogy"?
If your Eminence would quote to me some one of these events in history," said Milady, "perhaps I should partake of your confidence as to the future.
Oh, it is well enough as the production of a human composer, sung by featherless bipeds, to quote the late Diogenes.
Do not think that I could write to you in a satirical vein, for I am too old to show my teeth to no purpose, and people would laugh at me, and quote our Russian proverb: "Who diggeth a pit for another one, the same shall fall into it himself.
To quote some Latin verses I have forgotten, or rather, never knew well, `the thunderbolt never falls on the valleys,' and I am a valley, dear Rochefort, -- one of the lowliest of the low.
He had begun to quote from a speech delivered by Gouverneur Morris, on the right of deposit at New Orleans, and which he had spoken at college, and was near getting into a part of the subject that might not have been so apposite, but retreated in time.
It was 'on the tip of my tongue' to quote the words "His only books are woman's looks
I will not destroy its simplicity or its significance by any attempt to quote.