radar beam

radar beam

[′rā‚där ‚bēm]
(electromagnetism)
The movable beam of radio-frequency energy produced by a radar transmitting antenna; its shape is commonly defined as the loci of all points at which the power has decreased to one-half of that at the center of the beam.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

radar beam

A beam of focused electromagnetic energy radiated by radar. It is akin to a searchlight beam, although not in the visible spectrum. See fan beam.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Metawave's WARLORD(TM) radar system enables near instantaneous positioning of the radar beam anywhere within a set field of view (FOV), allowing the beam position to be changed in microseconds.
Phased arrays were invented for use in military radar systems, to scan the radar beam quickly across the sky to detect planes and missiles.
The FCC said the Soli sensor captures motion in a three-dimensional space using a radar beam to enable touchless control of functions or features that can benefit users with mobility or speech impairments.
Infinition suggested that this small difference was normal given that a projectile travels over three Oehler sensors, while the radar beam hits the bullet.
"The radar in Buffalo, that radar beam is at a 1 1/2 degree angle and it misses the bottom 4,000 feet above Rochester," he explained.
The RMS-metric is central in the identification of a blade passage, because it increases when the blade is in the radar beam, and constant in all other cases.
The 18-bit computer and beyond the horizon pulse mode allowed the radar to detect ships at sea when the radar beam is directed below the horizon.
Note that the beam width of the ML1 was 7.5[degrees], but it should be smaller to avoid the mismatching problem between radar beam and microwave link beam especially when the link path is long.
Taylor said that dark depression at Phaethon's center "could be a crater or some other topographic depression that did not reflect the radar beam back to Earth."
When the radar beam reaches a target, like a rain drop, it induces minute voltages and current in the target.
Furthermore, the product's radar beam can be emitted over a wider angular range, without requiring a mechanism to adjust the angle, as with previous versions.

Full browser ?