radar bombing

radar bombing

[′rā‚där ‚bäm·iŋ]
(ordnance)
Bombing in which radar is used to locate the target or aiming point, to aid in positioning the bombing aircraft at the proper release point for bombing, or to release bombs automatically, especially under conditions of poor visibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
The physicist and future Nobel Prize laureate Luis Alvarez, who was an observer on the Hiroshima mission, later wrote that he always took the story about the last-minute hole in the clouds "with a grain of salt," noting that the errors in placing the bomb were similar to those that occurred with radar bombing.
Radar bombing provided SAC the means to deliver atomic weapons through adverse weather and under the cover of darkness; however, Kenney and McMullen failed to offer sufficient guidance on training.
The school put more emphasis on radar bombing as a means of selection since this procedure required greater concentration and perfection of technique.
He married his wife, Frances Hildreth Townes, in 1941, and during World War II designed radar bombing systems for Bell Laboratories.
One supervisor notes that, "he would be extremely useful as a member of an advanced party, when setting up new Radar Bombing System sites.
In contrast to World War II high-altitude visual bombing accuracy that averaged perhaps 2,000 feet in good weather and SAC high-level radar bombing in the early 1960s, that averaged around 1,300 feet, PGMs could get bombs within tens of feet of the target.
As operations officer of VMA-323, I learned that mission requirements fell into six general categories: interdiction, close air support, armed reconnaissance, rescue combat air patrol, precision radar bombing and air defense.
Precision radar bombing missions were used against targets normally within 10 miles of the frontlines and heavily defended by enemy antiaircraft weapons.
The strike would occur from high altitude, at night, using radar bombing techniques.
As described earlier, the existing MSQ-77 Sky Spot radars in South Vietnam and Thailand allowed radar bombing up to 196 nautical miles from the stations, which limited them to targets only as far as Route Pack 3.
In the lead article of this issue, Howard Plunkett tells the story of radar bombing in Rolling Thunder.
Also called synchronous radar bombing and buddy bombing, this method required the EB-66 navigator to use his K-5 radar bombing navigation system to detect the target and send a signal tone to the F-105s to drop their bombs.

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