radar cross section


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radar cross section

[′rā‚där ′krȯs ‚sek·shən]
(electromagnetism)

radar cross section (RCS)

radar cross section (RCS)
Radar cross section of a combat aircraft from various angles. It looks bigger from directly below or directly from the top than in a turn. It is the least when viewed directly from the front or the rear and is maximum when viewed from either side.
The measure of reflectivity of the received radar signals by an aircraft, it is expressed as square meters (m2). It is dependent on the true size, range, aspect, geometric shape, materials, surface texture, and other properties of the target aircraft. The most important element is the target aspect [i.e., the area normal (perpendicular) to the radar axis]. The higher the area, the greater the RCS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knott, Radar Cross Section Measurements, SciTech Publishing, 2006.
Wang, "An electronically controllable method for radar cross section reduction for a microstrip antenna," Progress In Electromagnetics Research, Vol.
The relationship between the Radar cross section components and the 2D-fourier transformation of the scattered field (Equations (60) and (61)) is valid only for the traveling modes, where [beta] is real.
This research field of radar cross section has gained a wide attention from radar researchers and engineers as it is useful in design.
Researchers wondered whether the wiring in a suicide vest would alter the radar cross section of a bomber enough to allow a radar gun to pick him or her out in a crowd, reports New Scientist.
To help maintain a low observable radar cross section, the arresting hook in the F-117 is sealed inside the aircraft.
The core of this material consists of a systematic presentation of the problem of electromagnetic waves analysis in bistatic systems and related questions of radar cross section analysis and signal models.
In the area of signature testing, he led a government-industry team that reviewed government radar cross section test facilities and recommended future investments to advance such testing across industry.
Airframe tests include airframe/drive system/rotor stability and development; power plant and airframe structure performance; load and vibration limits; drive system torsion stability; fuel, fire detection and extinguishing systems; maximum and minimum temperature monitoring plus heat and cooling surveys; icing systems development; engine inlet distortion; ground and air resonance; and radar cross section testing.
There will also be three tours available to attendees: the Air Combat Environment Test and Evaluation Facility; facilities and capabilities of the Atlantic Test Range; and the Facility for Antenna Radar Cross Section Measurement.
As part of a national effort to standardize radar cross section (RCS) measurements, NIST delivered a set of standard precision cylinders to a private company in McKinney, Texas, in December 2002.
WRIGHT-PATERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio (AFPN) -- Air Force officials announced the completion of the final two requirements -- first flight of Raptor 4006 and initiating radar cross section testing -- which clear the way for an F-22 production decision.