radar interferometry

radar interferometry

[¦rā‚där ‚in·tər·fə′räm·ə·trē]
(geophysics)
A microwave remote sensing method for combining imagery collected over time by radar systems on board airplane or satellite platforms to map the elevations, movements, and changes of the earth's surface. Such detectable changes include earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, landslides, and underground explosions, as well as fires, floods, forestry operations, moisture changes, and vegetation growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Major project karlsruhe-basel pfa 7.1 tunnel offenburg radar interferometry
F.: 2013, Surface deformation induced by water influx in the abandoned coal mines in Limburg, The Netherlands observed by satellite radar interferometry. J.
These very high-resolution data can be processed by a technique called radar interferometry to reveal how the ground surface below has moved between images.
Feigl, "Radar interferometry and its application to changes in the Earth's surface," Reviews of Geophysics, vol.
Arnaud (1995), "Deflation of Mount Etna Monitored by Spaceborne Radar Interferometry," Nature 375, 567-570.
The satellites use a technique called radar interferometry, which enables scientists to measure very precisely-within less than a quarter of an inch-how much Earth's surface is moving.
Werner, "Satellite radar interferometry: two-dimensional phase unwrapping," Radio Science, vol.
The ground-based radar interferometry has been confirmed as a useful tool for measuring the deformation of a bridge during a static load test.
Goldstein, "Synthetic aperture radar interferometry," Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol.
F., Radar Interferometry, Data Interpretation and Error Analysis, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002.
Space-borne differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR), and in particular new advanced processing techniques such as Permanent Scatterer Interferometry (pSInSAR or PSI, Ferretti et al.