radar reflection

radar reflection

[′rā‚där ri‚flek·shən]
(electromagnetism)
The return of electromagnetic waves, generated by a radar installation, from an object on which the waves are incident.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
seconds to go" to minimize radar reflection to the North Vietnamese
While reducing the reflected "scattering" to a radar signal, FRACTAL not only found a way to make the reflections disappear, but also found other unique fractal-based solutions that actually enhanced radar reflection. Such unusual reflectors are now called "superscatterers".
[[summation].sub.q] = diag([c.sub.q]) with [c.sub.q] = [[[[gamma].sub.1q], ..., [[gamma].sub.Kq]].sup.T] accounts for the Doppler effect and the radar reflection coefficient fading which follows the Swerling I model [22].
The radar reflection characteristics of the surrounding environment are regarded as time invariant.
Solar radar would utilize direct radar reflection from the solar plasma along with radar scatter from plasma waves in coronal arcs and CMEs.
The AI will be trained through machine learning on images where changes in radar reflection are displayed as waveforms, and will then determine whether they are cavities or sewer pipes.
"Both systems are reportedly designed to minimize their radar cross-section via low-observable features such as stealth coatings that absorb the radio waves of adversary radar and shaping measures that minimize radar reflection," the report said.
Rubin, "Soil moisture content estimation using ground penetrating radar reflection data," Journal of Hydrology, Vol.
Even that ALOS acquisitions have relatively high resolution, the phase values will be influenced by radar reflection from all scatterers within 10x10 m resolution cell while positions of the levelling points are clearly known.
For example, with tests of the sea-based Aegis system, much larger targets than would be expected in real attacks have been used, with the mock warhead remaining attached to the body of the missile much longer than would be expected, creating a larger radar reflection that is easier for the system to track, Wright said.
Data analysis of the "amateur" version of the meteor radar--the passive forward-scatter technique--is even more challenging, as the strength of the radar reflection is not correlated with the brightness of the corresponding meteor.