radial motion

radial motion

[′rād·ē·əl ′mō·shən]
(mechanics)
Motion in which a body moves along a line connecting it with an observer or reference point; for example, the motion of stars which move toward or away from the earth without a change in apparent position.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on VVI results, we observed significant impairment in longitudinal and radial motion of the CCA in patients with both TAK and SLE.
The main reason is that, compared with complicated axial motion, the radial motion of the rotor is relatively simpler and smoother.
The modern CNC hobbing machines permit the radial motion of the workpiece-table and the axial movement of the tool.
we get the following equation for the neutron radial motion near the surface of the cylinder:
The expansion of the phase component [[phi].sub.i] can be seen as two parts: the inherent phase terms and the additional phase terms resulting from radial motion.
When the team compared the tangential motion of the outer halo stars with their radial motion, they were very surprised to find that the two were equal.
In studying the radial motion through the event horizon (a black hole's boundary) of two different types of black holes--Schwarzschild and Einstein-Rosen, both of which are mathematically legitimate solutions of general relativity--Poplawski admits that only experimentation or observation can reveal the motion of a particle falling into an actual black hole, but he also notes that, since observers only can see the outside of the black hole, the interior cannot be viewed unless someone (or something) enters or resides within.
This therapeutic device has a sophisticated and advanced irrigation system employing hydrodynamic cavitation producing transient radial motion of bubbles wherein the individual manipulates the hand piece of the sealed eye cup irrigator to wash or remove gunk's from his/her eyes.
The radial motion measured on FC500 under pulse excitation is shown in Fig.
For pure radial motion [??] [equivalent to] [??] [equivalent to] = 0 and hence equation (3.5) reduces to
However, as is well known, the illusion of radial motion can be created by changing the amplitude of the signal emitted from an immobile sound source (Vartanian & Chernigovskaia, 1980).
This type of motion in depth generates radial motion (expansion or contraction) in the retinal image.