radiation budget


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radiation budget

[‚rād·ē′ā·shən ‚bəj·ət]
(geophysics)
A quantitative statement of the amounts of radiation entering and leaving a given region of the earth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study could also enhance global climate research, because clustering decreases the lifespan of clouds and subsequently affects the radiation budget and climate.
The satellite is equipped with (http://www.jpss.noaa.gov/mission_and_instruments.html) plenty of instruments like an Ozone mapping and profiles suite, a cross-tracking infrared sounder and a radiation budget instrument that it will use to collect data on the Earth to then return to NOAA and the National Weather Service.
While we are not proposing to move forward with Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3), Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE), Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Pathfinder (CLARREO PF), and the Radiation Budget Instrument (RBI), this budget still includes significant Earth Science efforts, including 18 Earth observing missions in space as well as airborne missions.
Part of RAVANs appeal is its potential to use small instrumentation to provide more accurate measurements of two key indicators of climate change: earth radiation imbalance (ERI) and earth radiation budget (ERB).
Often the short- and longwave contributions to the radiation budget have been studied separately.
Exelis (NYSE: XLS) said it has been awarded a contract by NASA worth up to USD208m to build the radiation budget instrument, a satellite payload that will improve scientific understanding of climate change.
Among the absorbing aerosols, black carbon (BC) is gaining considerable significance because it is a strong absorber of the solar radiation in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths and subsequently because of its ability to alter the radiation budget [3,4].
After an overview of remote sensing, it covers data processing methods and techniques, estimating surface radiation budget components, estimating biophysical and biochemical variables, estimating water balance components, and production generation and application demonstrations.
We're continuing the legacy of the most accurate Earth radiation budget observations ever made," said CERES project scientist Kory Priestley, of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
It also allows scientists to map the Earth's radiation budget to assess its impacts on climate and weather, and to assess Earth's gravity field to evaluate its role in ocean circulation and climate.
A widely accepted understanding ([2], chapter 9) is that the equation for the average radiation budget B at the top of the atmosphere