radiation dermatitis


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radiation dermatitis

[‚rād·ē′ā·shən ‚dər·mə′tīd·əs]
(medicine)
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These can be categorized in the RTOG acute toxicity definition of radiation dermatitis. However, Camidge and Price fashioned a new categorization of RRD that includes pruritus, urticaria, and vesiculation (Table 1) [8].
Potential adverse effects of radiation therapy to this region are acute effects, such as radiation dermatitis, mucositis, and conjunctivitis, as well as late effects, such as fibrosis, cataracts, and bone necrosis.
Diabetes (P = 0.01), skin graft and/or vascularized flap reconstruction (P = 0.01), grade [greater than or equal to] 2 radiation dermatitis (P = 0.02), and 3D conformal RT relative to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy (P = 0.008) were associated with an increased risk of any wound complication.
Further products include a nasal spray, enema and a cream for radiation dermatitis and their launches are anticipated during the financial year.
(26) Radiation dermatitis and lichen sclerosus are rarely seen in facial biopsies.
Acute radiation dermatitis manifests as a spectrum of symptoms that range from no cutaneous changes to the most severe clinical disease which include hemorrhage ulceration and necrosis.89 Between these extremes patients may experience erythema depilation pruritus dyspigmentation dry desquamation patchy moist desquamation limited to intertriginous areas confluent and widespread moist desquamation edema and alopecia.
Over 90% of patients who undergo modified radical mastectomy for their locally advanced disease requiring adjuvant chest wall radiotherapy develop radiation dermatitis. Breast cancer patients receiving chest wall radiotherapy develop acute skin toxicity (radiation dermatitis) during the course of radiotherapy or a short period after the completion of radiotherapy.
Thomas Leung, MD, PhD, an instructor in dermatology at Stanford and a pediatric dermatologist at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and his colleagues knew that many skin disorders, including eczema and radiation dermatitis, have an inflammatory component.
The most common toxicity was radiation dermatitis. Details of toxicity are shown in Table 3.
The ONS Putting Evidence Into Practice (PEP) Intervention of Radiation Dermatitis Project Team reviewed, critiqued, and summarized the research evidence for nursing interventions for patients experiencing radiation dermatitis.