radiation fog


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Related to radiation fog: Advection fog, Upslope fog, Sea smoke

radiation fog

[‚rād·ē′ā·shən ‚fäg]
(meteorology)
A major type of fog, produced over a land area when radiational cooling reduces the air temperature to or below its dew point; thus, strictly, a nighttime occurrence, although the fog may begin to form by evening twilight and often does not dissipate until after sunrise.

radiation fog

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A type of fog formed by the cooling of the earth's surface at night, which, in turn, cools the adjoining layer of air above it rapidly to an extent that the dew point is reached. This type of fog may occur even when the relative humidity has not reached 100%. It is the result of the presence of hygroscopic nuclei, especially smoke particles, in the atmosphere. A very slight wind, a clear night, and low temperatures are prerequisites for the formation of radiation fog. Radiation fog is a common feature after the passage of cold fronts. Also known as ground fog.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While all of these studies provided valuable insight into the behavior of fog, precise details that govern its initial formation, and subsequent development of stable radiation fog into deeper adiabatic fog, remain elusive in the literature.
1) better understand the sensitivity of radiation fog formation to turbulence, humidity, and dew deposition;
Stromberg, "A field study of radiation fog in Meppen, West Germany," Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, vol.
The first three cases occur in winter and are characterized as radiation fogs; the latter two occur in summer and are best characterized as advection and orographic fogs.
In addition, radiation fog can form in many of the riverine, bay, and estuary valleys that are found in this area.
The high number of VO fatal crashes in the interior locations of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast are triggered by two different types of fog: 1) radiation fog that is caused when relatively moist, cool air pools in many of the river valleys that interlace the region and 2) fog caused by stratiform clouds that can intersect ridges of the Appalachians.
Cuxart et al., "Intercomparison of single-column numerical models for the prediction of radiation fog," Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, vol.
Conversely, radiation fog tends to be patchy or isolated.
The good news is that radiation fog is a nocturnal or early morning event when most general aviation pilots are safely on the ground.
Laaksonen, "On the formation of radiation fogs under heavily polluted conditions," Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol.
Collet Jr., 2007: Air pollution processing by radiation fogs. Water Air Soil Pollut., 181, 65-75, doi:10.1007 /s11270-006-9276-x.

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