radiation fog


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Related to radiation fog: Advection fog, Upslope fog, Sea smoke

radiation fog

[‚rād·ē′ā·shən ‚fäg]
(meteorology)
A major type of fog, produced over a land area when radiational cooling reduces the air temperature to or below its dew point; thus, strictly, a nighttime occurrence, although the fog may begin to form by evening twilight and often does not dissipate until after sunrise.

radiation fog

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A type of fog formed by the cooling of the earth's surface at night, which, in turn, cools the adjoining layer of air above it rapidly to an extent that the dew point is reached. This type of fog may occur even when the relative humidity has not reached 100%. It is the result of the presence of hygroscopic nuclei, especially smoke particles, in the atmosphere. A very slight wind, a clear night, and low temperatures are prerequisites for the formation of radiation fog. Radiation fog is a common feature after the passage of cold fronts. Also known as ground fog.
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There are no red, blue, or purple symbols or dashed lines that warn the pilot, "Look out, radiation fog headed your way.
Snow prevents this thermal transfer from the soil that delays or degrades the onset of radiation fog.
Unfortunately for forecasters, radiation fog is not purely a surface event.
Radiation fog does not always require clear skies as was previously embraced.
Warmer ground temperatures tend to delay or prevent radiation fog from forming.
Area forecasts (FAs) are not helpful for isolated radiation fog events.
It's not unusual for two airports 10 miles from each other to see an onset of radiation fog many hours apart.
Radiation fog can take the visibility below one eighth of a statute mile in the time it takes you to preflight and taxi to the runway.
RELATED ARTICLE: What ups figured out about radiation fog.

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