radiation intensity


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radiation intensity

[‚rād·ē′ā·shən in‚ten·səd·ē]
(electromagnetism)
The power radiated from an antenna per unit solid angle in a given direction.
(nucleonics)
The quantity of radiant energy passing perpendicularly through a specified location of unit area in unit time; reported as a number of particles or photons per square centimeter per second, or in energy units such as ergs per square centimeter per second.
References in periodicals archive ?
1]) and each of the coefficients of a, n and b were each used in a multiple regression against infrared radiation intensity (IR) in W/[cm.
During metal arc welding produced UV radiation intensity depends on the arc temperature in welding point.
The results were also compared with the intensity values of UVA and UVB radiation intensity emitted from the Sun.
4 the averaged experimental results of UVA and UVB radiation intensity under different electric current strength of a welding machine are presented.
During the experiments the values of UVA and UVB radiation intensity were measured, which are presented in Figs.
Table 1 presents the results of the experiments and data on the UVA and UVB radiation intensity emitted from various sources as well as data on the dose received, and the received dose is compared with the minimum erythema dose (MED) (dose causing skin blush).
Figure 8 shows the effect of radiation intensity on the measured birefringence.
Figure 10 shows the protrusion height change with the radiation intensity.
Also note that when the IR probe is "looking at" an empty cavity, the signal is below the minimum cutoff value, which means that the radiation intensity emitted from the cavity wall is below the sensitivity of the Vanzetti IR probe.
when crystalline regions predominates in front of amorphous regions, scattered radiation intensity increases with the increasing crystallinity, quite the reverse than for crystallinity values lesser than that percentage.
The measurements described above show that for regenerated cellulose tubular films (widely used as food packaging), given a similar surface roughness, for crystallinity values greater than around 57% scattered radiation intensity increases with the increasing crystallinity, quite the reverse than for crystallinity values less than that percentage.