radiate

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Related to radiative: Radiative forcing, Radiative recombination

radiate

1. (of a capitulum) consisting of ray florets
2. (of animals or their parts) showing radial symmetry
References in periodicals archive ?
effect of pH on the acetaminophen radiative decomposition were studied.
To simplify the model, equations combining radiative conductances are used:
The determination of the radiative and thermal properties of construction materials such as painted metal cladding and roofing is becoming more important as global awareness increases about the part that radiative properties play in helping reduce urban heat island effects and offset the use of CO2 generating cooling and heating systems.
Between 1990 and 2010, there was a 29 percent increase in radiative forcing
Radiative convective flows are encountered in countless industrial and environment processes e.
It's also sad news for the climate community - Glory promised to provide important information for better understanding Earth's radiative balance.
The external heat transfer coefficient of roof coating is estimated from the constituent sum of convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients of the external surface (EN ISO 6946:2008; Oliveti et al.
Chapter 1 introduces the subject at a very basic level, evoking an understanding of radiative transfer as "the most common energy transport phenomenon that we feel around us every day" and explaining how a systematic understanding has major implications in the design of industrial applications at any scale.
The total radiative forcing of all long- lived greenhouse gases increased by 27.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A nanoantenna capable of providing the most antenna efficiency and radiative decay rate was designed by the Iranian researchers at Persian Gulf University, Bushehr.
And there is only one form of heat leaving the planet, and that is radiative heat (which is invisible, or what physicists call long-wave radiation).
But sometimes, they fall into a hole and emit a photon, an energy-squandering process called radiative recombination.