radiative capture

radiative capture

[′rād·ē‚ād·iv ′kap·chər]
(nuclear physics)
A nuclear capture process whose prompt result is the emission of electromagnetic radiation only.
References in periodicals archive ?
But if researchers can get a good enough estimate of what's known as the 'radiative capture reaction rate,' they can begin to work out the answers to fundamental questions, such as the ratio of carbon to oxygen in the universe.
The radiative capture reaction rate refers to the reaction between a carbon-12 nucleus and a helium nucleus, also known as an alpha particle, that takes place within a star.
We do so in part (i) to study the hadron matrix elements in O(1/M), as the same matrix elements, albeit at different momentum transfers, enter in muon radiative capture [3], and (ii) to test the Dirac structure of the weak current, through the determination of the circular polarization of the associated photon [4, 5].
Contributions from radiative capture and scattering on materials other than the intended target are measured by performing background runs.