radio beam


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radio beam

[′rād·ē·ō ‚bēm]
(electromagnetism)
A concentrated stream of radio-frequency energy as used in radio ranges, microwave relays, and radar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even the mere existence of Galileo's radio beam, independent of whatever scientific data it carries, will be valuable, letting researchers measure subtle changes in the craft's trajectory and thus determine Earth's mass more accurately than has been possible with any past spacecraft.
Such gaps may be created when the sun blocks the craft's radio beam to Earth.
But that could be because Pioneer Venus spent most of its time orbiting too high for its Earthbound radio beam to go through the ionosphere.
Measurements made by aiming Voyager's earthward radio beam thorugh the rings indicated that most of the particles were more like boulders a meter or more in size, according to G.
These magnetic poles are the site of pulsar radio emission so astronomers expect the radio beams to point in a similar direction as the jets.
By analyzing the radio beams, researchers can probe the wild things that happen when the small but massive celestial objects circle each other at roughly a million kilometers an hour.
Millimeter wave (mmWave) beam switching technology provides fast switching of radio beams to mobile users, and therefore allows seamless Gbps-grade service in mobile environments.
The radio beams radiated by the transmit antenna can be deemed many ray tubes.
Together, these antennas transmit radio beams to ILS receivers aboard the approaching aircraft which are then used to determine the aircraft's position.
What will happen in many poor countries without electricity whose wind-up wirelesses give them the freedom they have not had before to listen to our radio beams without hindrance?
Apparently the rotating gamma-ray beams are much wider than the radio beams, are oriented differently, and originate in different areas around the pulsars.