radio duct

radio duct

[′rād·ē·ō ‚dəkt]
(geophysics)
An atmospheric layer, typically shallow and almost horizontal, in which radio waves propagate in an anomalous fashion; ducts occur when, due to sharp inversions of temperature or humidity, the vertical gradient of the radio index of refraction exceeds a critical value.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

radio duct

The layer within which the state of superrefraction exists. The meteorological requirements for superrefraction conditions are the presence of a temperature inversion and the rapid decrease of height. Ducting seldom occurs below 1000 MHz. For the anomalous propagation of radio waves, it is necessary that the duct exist over the whole range of propagation (i.e., both at the transmitter and the receiver). See duct propagation.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
Mentioned in ?
Full browser ?