radio energy

radio energy

[′rād·ē·ō ‚en·ər·jē]
(electromagnetism)
The energy carried by radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
RADIO energy bursts from deep space could be evidence of alien life using technology far more advanced than our own.
For example, as early as 1994, radar pulses fired from the orbiting Clementine spacey craft and recorded on Earth after bouncing off the Moon revealed that some polar craters reflect the radio energy strongly, suggestive of water ice sequestered on their floors.
Also, considering communication consumes more than 65% of the total energy [10], lots of coding or compression approaches were proposed to optimize the radio energy consumption.
Radio energy, considering both the sender and receiver nodes ([E.sub.radio]), is expressed as follows.
Radar, an acronym for radio detection and ranging, is the process of pointing a narrowly focused radio antenna at a known azimuth and tilt ("elevation" whenever we are talking about radar), transmitting a radio energy pulse, and measuring how long it takes for reflected energy from a target to come back.
Energy can be harvested from radio energy (RF sources), captured from vibration, pressure by piezoelectric elements, or from light through photovoltaic cells.
This is the first time high-energy photons have been associated with these blasts of radio energy, known as fast radio bursts.
Similarly, wiring runs can themselves become antennas, converting received radio energy into electrical potential.
Bobkov originally discovered a type of olfactory neuron in lobsters that constantly discharges small bursts of electrical pulses, much like radar uses pulses of radio energy to detect airplanes or thunderstorms.
This section presents the assumptions and radio energy model of the network under consideration.

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