radio intelligence

radio intelligence

[′rād·ē·ō in′tel·ə·jəns]
(communications)
Information regarding the enemy obtained by interception and interpretation of enemy radio transmissions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the valuable lessons learned during World War II, he assisted in developing and implementing radio intelligence training for the Army Security Agency (ASA).
From large but hidden radio listening posts--not only on Chopmist Hill but also in Maine, New York, Maryland, Florida, and Washington State--the FCC's Radio Intelligence Division (RID) saved lives, uncovered German spies and saboteurs, and more.
With this radio intelligence, City Furniture gains flexibility, better network efficiency and optimized network design.
During World War II, Vine served in radio intelligence in the Navy and spoke three languages.
The first wireless transmission from a Navy ship in 1899 created newly assigned responsibilities in radio intelligence and communications security to Sailors and Marines.
338th communication hub, Kara-Balta (Spartak, Chaldovar), Chui oblast The telecommunication terminal of the Russian Navy organizes radio communication between ships and submarines, radio intelligence and radio electronic combat.
ANSWERS: 1 Greek; 2 Ringo Starr; 3 Tonic water; 4 Toploader; 5 Chiang Kai-shek; 6 North Africa; 7 Radio intelligence and code-breaking; 8 The Duchess of
Naval radio intelligence unit that was created deep in occupied China to intercept and decode Japanese radio messages during World War II.
One of the most important technical enablers for flexible spectrum usage is the development of Software Defined Radio (SDR) which greatly enhances devices radio intelligence and re-configurability (KOCH, 2009).
Planners from Tokyo's Naval General Staff and on the Combined Fleet (Kaigun) staff had developed a synchronized plan for the Pearl Harbor Striking Force that combined the three elements of radio silence, active radio deception, and radio intelligence in a way that assured Tokyo that the U.S.
They did 10 more operations with 1474 Flight, which was then the only airborne unit doing radar and radio intelligence. It was later expanded to #192 Squadron, but the heavy secrecy that hung over Gransden Lodge still kept them pretty much in the dark.