radio interception

radio interception

[′rād·ē·ō ‚in·tər′sep·shən]
(communications)
Tuning in on a radio message not intended for the listener.
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Australian author David Dufty's recent publication, The Secret Code-Breakers of Central Bureau, provides a delightfully and thoroughly engaging story of the emergence of the Australian contribution to the signals and radio interception intelligence, and how these relatively small units, and their staff, produced some of the most significant intelligence successes of the war in the Pacific.
AMONG ALL THE RID LOCATIONS, in Latin America and in the States, Chopmist Hill was the top facility for radio interception. The site first came to the FCC's attention thanks to Thomas B.
One day before the Channel Dash, a frustrated Colonel Wallace of the British Radio Interception Unit told a member of British Intelligence, "Will you chaps take me seriously?
Question eight: Whitehouse Farm in Stockton was home to one of the important radio interception stations built across the country during the First World War to plot the positions of enemy naval transmitters and Zeppelins.
There scientists would be able to observe phenomena, which cannot be seen from the Earth because of the atmosphere and radio interception.
The Hokkaido operations outlined by Kawabe included gathering information from the Japanese people still remaining in Soviet-occupied Sakhalin and the Kuril islands, sending repatriates back into the Soviet Union as agents, and utilizing radio interception, according to the memorandum.
Undoubtedly, computerbased decryption systems remain major tools of comint gathering at all levels, but the problem of overcoming radio interception still remains.
As THE COLD WAR INTENSIFIED, realisation dawned on politicians and service chiefs that the United Kingdom needed a pool of intelligence personnel familiar enough with the Russian language to be able to carry out tasks ranging from radio interception to interrogation.
They also rely almost exclusively on American intelligence; satellite pictures, aircraft reconnaissance, spies and radio interception information all come from the Pentagon.
A radio interception from the KNU confirmed that Myanmar's Prime Minister Than Shwe had ordered deployment of 24 battalions, in addition to 28 battalions already there, to its border area near Thailand.
It was confirmed both by radio interceptions of terrorists and by photo and video recordings from citizens of the local cities that the terrorists have at least two SA systems.
The SIS mounted a major counterespionage effort in response, using its best agents and drawing on RID radio interceptions, FBI code-breaking, and paid informants.