radio noise


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radio noise

[′rād·ē·ō ‚nȯiz]
(electromagnetism)
Electromagnetic noise having radio frequencies.

radio noise

A noise or a disturbance in radio wave reception that may be caused by poor-quality components, bad contacts, small thermal motion within the sets that appears as a hissing noise in speakers and grass on radar screens, and external atmospheric disturbances.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rotary dimmer features full dimming with any brightness, at any brightness, saves energy and is designed and manufactured with radio noise suppression circuitry.
The G5's full-duplex radio utilizes the latest in digital signaling and correlation technology to slice through radio noise levels and enhance radio reading performance.
That's because the far side faces away from the radio noise and other electromagnetic disturbances emanating from our planet.
Over much of the spectrum, the FCC has proposed UWB levels equal to the permitted radio noise levels from an ordinary personal computer (in FCC terminology, the "Class B limits").
Between the natural background radio noise of the galaxy and the radio absorption of our planet's atmosphere, is a low noise region of the radio spectrum, which scientists speculate might attract interstellar communication.
Most of the frequency shift that the scientists measured came from radio noise from the sun's corona and the relative motion of the antennas on Cassini and Earth.
Fantasma's "underlying technology(TM)" enables scarce spectrum resources to be used very efficiently because conventional receivers "see" Fantasma's UWB pulses as little more than background radio noise.
The plug's copper core fine wire electrodes reduce misfires, and its patented Mag suppressor replaces the resistor to suppress ignition radio noise interference without reducing ignition performance.
Ulysses doesn't carry a camera, but it can use its radio receivers to detect heat from the fireballs--once they rise above the radio noise of Jupiter's ionosphere.
Since November, ALEXIS' radio receiver has recorded some 100 pulses of radio energy 10,000 times stronger than the radio noise generated by lightning.
The discharges would be far too weak to detect from Earth, either in photos or by their static-like radio noise, though they may be visible to the Galileo spacecraft, due for launch toward Jupiter this October and scheduled to go into orbit around the planet in 1995 to study it and its moons.
Adds Dessler, "There's a mystery brewing about where the radio noise is.

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