radio noise


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radio noise

[′rād·ē·ō ‚nȯiz]
(electromagnetism)
Electromagnetic noise having radio frequencies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

radio noise

A noise or a disturbance in radio wave reception that may be caused by poor-quality components, bad contacts, small thermal motion within the sets that appears as a hissing noise in speakers and grass on radar screens, and external atmospheric disturbances.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
As seen in Table 3, although the SNR steepest ascent method with CSLE performed best on the Mics 1 and 2 loud radio noise condition, this was by a narrow margin, and various other configurations proved slightly better for other noise conditions.
Al Kogut of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and his colleagues calculate that the radio noise is much too loud to come from the combined emissions of all the galaxies in the universe that emit radio waves.
This is the same temperature as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, the remnant heat of the Big Bang that was itself discovered as cosmic radio noise in 1965.
radio noise is either distant lightning (for someone on a rural road far
Isolating ISM into bands of its own made particular sense, because some ISM equipment generates high power radio noise that otherwise threatens sensitive communications equipment.
The nation is moving to a moderate centrist philosophy in defiance of the radio noise.
"The technology that will be deployed in volume will be at low power levels in comparison to the general radio noise that's already out there," he said.
The dimmer is designed and manufactured with radio noise suppression circuitry, and is available with decorator wall plates in white or ivory.
External radio noise data is often described in terms of an effective F or noise factor.
Still, over the past few years, Cirrus Aircraft did extensive flight testing in hopes of reducing radio noise caused by p-static interference on its composite airplanes.
During a high-intensity blitz that lasted more than 10 minutes, the storm swamped the entire sunlit side of Earth with radio noise. Across North and South America and parts of the Pacific, it overwhelmed dozens of radio receivers linked to the Global Positioning System (GPS).

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