radio signal


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radio signal

[′rād·ē·ō ‚sig·nəl]
(communications)
A signal transmitted by radio.

radio signal

The transmission of electromagnetic energy. See radio.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have all been annoyed by weak radio signals at some point in our lives: our favourite song in the car turning to noise, being too far away from our wifi router to check our email.
This method cancels the noise by using the correlation between the noise in the frequency at which no radio signal exists and the noise superimposed on the radio signal [5].
Unfortunately, standard radio systems are extremely vulnerable to 'black spots.' Typically, these are solid structures that make up the platform and block radio signals, making it impossible for the targeted receiving radio to receive the signal.
Microwave ovens, which emit radio signals, can also interfere.
Furthermore, I would like to assert that, related to the K' reference frame, the frame taken by the author of [2] to explain the relevance of the GPS reference frame in terms of special relativity: the radio signals turn out to be irrelevant to be taken into consideration once the clocks within K are synchronized, viz., the Lorentz transformations for events do consider radio signals intrinsically under the synchronization of clocks in a given reference frame.
'This report is consistent with the previous reports in its findings that radio signals emitted from telecommunications masts are significantly below international guidelines,' he said.
calculating the difference between the predicted value and the real one of the radio signal envelope level;
It showed radio signal levels were significantly below the limits set by international guidelines adopted by the Public Commission for the Protection of Marine Resources, Environment and Wildlife.
The method uses radio tomographic imaging to locate and track moving people or objects in an area that's surrounded by inexpensive transceivers that send and receive radio signals. Those identified and followed don't need to be wearing radio-transmitting identification tags, Patwari said.
While some buildings get good coverage from external cell towers, many others have spotty coverage because concrete, steel, and other building materials block cellular radio signals, or because the nearest external cell tower is just too far away.
While it may not exactly qualify as an amenity in a neighborhood in which billions of dollars of transportation infrastructure and office and residential development are being built, downtown will soon be able to count a never fuzzy CBS radio signal on both the AM and FM dials as an added perk.
But because some RFIDs broadcast a weak radio signal, does this constitute a publication that violates a person's right to privacy?