radio storm

radio storm

[′rād·ē·ō ‚stȯrm]
(astrophysics)
A prolonged period of disturbed emission or reception that lasts for periods of hours up to days.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
RADIO STORM: Jonathan Ross, left, who has been suspended, and Lesley Douglas, right, who resigned
7, 2005, the Owens Valley array recorded a relatively low-level radio storm, and Cerruti documented for the first time the loss or degradation of signals by several GPS receivers.
Broadcasting over a selection of frequencies greater than just L1 and L2 could also increase the odds that a radio storm would not dramatically interfere with GPS operations.
Previous errors have caused the Air Force to underestimate solar radio storms at least twice in the recent past, he adds.
The Taoiseach was still reeling from a nightmare poll which shows his credibility has been wrecked by the radio storm when Mr Grealish spoke out.
The spectrum or radio emission of Jupiter ranges from 40MHz to a few kHz, but the radio storms easily detectable from Earth happen just above 15 MHz up to a limit of approximately 25 MHz.
"Relationship between CALL and Io's phase according to Jupiter's actual radio storms observations", IJP, vol.
Astronomers have already been recording intense radio storms from the closest gas giant for decades, ever since Bernard Burke and Kenneth Franklin discovered Jupiter's radio outbursts in 1955 (see box on page 28).
Compared to Earth's auroras, Jupiter's radio storms are intense.
RELATED ARTICLE: Discovering Jupiter's Radio Storms