radio transponder

radio transponder

[′rād·ē·ō tran′spän·dər]
(electronics)
A transponder which receives and transmits radio waves, in contrast to a sonar transponder, which receives and transmits acoustic waves.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
NASA's current guidance states:The organization's original diagnosis of the Image mission failure blamed the "instant trip" of the solid state power controller, which supplied power to its radio transponder. It is not known under what circumstances the breaker would've tripped, or what could've possibly caused it to reset in the meantime.
Tracking usually involves affixing some sort of radio transponder to the animal and then monitoring locations with satellites, aircraft, drones or even Wi-Fi networks.
Jotron UK's gift included safety items such as new waterproof VHF emergency radios and a search and rescue radio transponder. Neil Atkinson, the company's spokesman, said: "We have been looking to associate ourselves with a youth-based community charity for some time.
The idea is that a radio transponder embedded in luggage tags will communicate with airport personnel via antennas placed in baggage areas.
I know this sounds fancy, but it was a weather balloon--you know one you blow up with helium on the ground--and then they tied a radio transponder package to it.
The microchip itself is a small radio transponder unit that transmits a radio signal carrying a 10-digit identification code back to the external reader whenever it receives on its antenna a radio frequency signal from the reader.
Project Wing, a part of Alphabet-owned X and founded by Google, plans on attaching radio transponders to its drones that will transmit its location details to other aircraft and to controllers.
This uses radio transponders to communicate both with nearby vehicles and the road infrastructure as a way of preventing accidents.
The study took place between 2006 and 2008, with birds being fitted with tiny radio transponders that were detected each time an individual visited the nest in order to feed the chicks.
Many of the components incorporated into these devices can he traced as far back as the 1930s, and the military's use of long-range, radio transponders in Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems.