radio-range

radio-range

radio-range
An obsolete radio directional aid that could be received by a normal wireless telegraph (W/T) receiver. A ground station transmitted repeatedly the Morse letters A or N over four sectors; the adjacent sectors were different. The overlapping of the signals created four beams, or legs, in which a continuous note could be heard, thus providing a track guide. The beams were not usually at 90° but often adjusted to provide a track along an airway. At points along the beams, fan markers were placed to provide an indication of distance from the station. Over the actual transmitter, a marker beacon sending repeated Z signals could be heard.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hardest thing for the newbie to master was, hands down, the aural radio-range. A pilot had to keep the signal extra-low to pick up minute volume changes that let him know whether he was headed in or out from the station, yet stay on top of what the Morse code signals were telling him about his orientation.
Most of the navigation problems dealt with the aural four-course radio-range, informally known as "the da-dits," although there was a brief introduction to the use of direction-finding.
That'll be our backup, according to the FAA, at least until even they become an historical footnote alongside low-frequency radio-ranges.