radiocarbon

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Related to radioactive carbon: C 14

radiocarbon

a radioactive isotope of carbon, esp carbon-14

radiocarbon

[¦rad·ē·ō′kär·bən]
(nuclear physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
Carbon atoms inside fossil fuels are so old that all the radioactive carbon has decayed and only stable atoms remain.
Our working hypothesis was that if DLIF and Dh-DLIF are synthesized de novo as suggested in the above experiments, then incubating the cultured cells with a rich source of a radioactive carbon pool, such as acetate, would produce [sup.
The sample was sealed up and left to incubate for several days, during which time the LR's detector monitored to see if the radioactive carbon in the broth somehow made it into the sample's air.
Patients swallow a tracer--a radioactive carbon, nitrogen, oxygen or fluorine fastened to a carrier molecule--or have it injected.
The new test involves drinking a small amount of vitamin B-12 labeled with radioactive carbon 14 (14C) and collecting a single drop of blood.
Age can then be determined by the levels of radioactive carbon in teeth.
The lightest is carbon 12, followed by carbon 1 3 and radioactive carbon 14 (radiocarbon).
An international team used radioactive carbon produced by atomic bomb testing during the 1950s and '60s to carbon-date neurons collected from people after they died.
Some were advances in science, such as the invention of radioactive carbon 14 dating, the cyclotron, the Wilson Cloud Chamber, nuclear fission, etc.
Dr Levin, a former sanitary engineer, in 1976 led an experiment, which mixed Martian soil with a nutrient containing radioactive carbon.
He received a Nobel Prize in 1960 for the discovery that organisms possess radioactive carbon that can be used to compute how long ago they lived.
However, carbon dating of bones older than about 30,000 years is skirting the limits of the technology, because by that age nearly all of the radioactive carbon has decayed, said Higham.