radioactive heat

radioactive heat

[¦rād·ē·ō′ak·tiv ′hēt]
(thermodynamics)
Heat produced within a medium as a result of absorption of radiation from decay of radioisotopes in the medium, such as thorium-232, potassium-40, uranium-238, and uranium-235.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 billion years ago - during what is known as the Archean Eon - because elements like potassium and uranium were decaying and releasing radioactive heat, according to (http://vtnews.
Despite being about 40 times farther from the sun than Earth, Pluto has enough radioactive heat left over from its formation 4.
Rehman et al [4] studied radioactive heat transfer flow of micropolar fluid with variable heat flux in porous medium.
Many space journeys--including the missions to Saturn (Cassini), and the recent one to Pluto (New Horizons)--use nuclear "batteries", which can convert the radioactive heat generated by plutonium into electricity.
6-billion-year history, potassium still contribute up to 20 percent of the radioactive heat, Stevenson says.
by CIA agent Ben Keynes (Jonas Ball), part of a Langley unit nervous about a radioactive heat signal picked up by a reconnaissance satellite above the Afghan mountains.
She went outside her house looking for relatives among the piles of bodies and animal carcasses killed by the intense, radioactive heat, she saw buildings and concrete streets with vaporized shadows of human figures etched on them.
The intense radioactive heat within today's operating reactors is the hottest anywhere on the planet.
Life could continue to thrive near hydrothermai vents on the ocean floor, which are warmed by radioactive heat from deep within the Earth.
Up until now, radioactive heat and power sources have been the preferred solution for lunar habitats, but these would multiply the cost and complexity of any expedition," ESA's Moritz Fontaine said at the time.
The ratio of radioactive heat production to other sources, the distribution [of radioactive elements] between mantle and crust, and the distribution of the different nuclides are presently not known with any certainty," says geophysicist Raymond Jeanloz of the University of California, Berkeley.
For instance, the canister's descent through the mud and the waste's radioactive heat might render the isotopes more mobile.