Nephropathy

(redirected from radiocontrast-induced nephropathy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

nephropathy

[nə′fräp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Any disease of the kidney.

Nephropathy

 

a general term that includes several renal disorders. Classified as nephropathies are nephropathy of pregnancy and a group of other kidney diseases that are distinguished from each other by a variety of morphological changes. This latter group of diseases includes myelogenous nephropathy, endemic, or Balkan, nephropathy, medicinally induced nephropathy, kaliopenic nephropathy, and hypercalcemic nephropathy.

REFERENCE

Osnovy nefrologii, vol. 2. Edited by E. M. Tareev. Moscow, 1972.
References in periodicals archive ?
Induction and prevention of radiocontrast-induced nephropathy in dogs with heart failure," Kidney International, vol.
Simultaneous hemodialysis during coronary angiography fails to prevent radiocontrast-induced nephropathy in chronic renal failure.
Sodium bicarbonate proved so superior to sodium chloride in preventing radiocontrast-induced nephropathy that the first randomized study to directly compare the two agents was halted early.