radiolucent

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Related to radiodensity: radiolucent

radiolucent

[¦rād·ē·ō′lüs·ənt]
(electromagnetism)
Transparent to x-rays and radio waves.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrary to these findings subareolar flame-disk shaped nodular radiodensity or non-mass like subareolar density with posterior linear projections radiating into the surrounding fatty tissue indicate gynecomastia.
Lateral weight-bearing view of the right foot (c) and left foot (d) showing the severe arch collapse and increased radiodensity of the body of the talus.
These changes likely account for the brittle quality of the weakened epiphysis in LCP, seen as increased radiodensity on imaging.
In vitro analysis of the radiodensity of indirect composites and ceramic inlay systems and its influence on the detection of cement overhangs.
The contrast media was a solution of polyethylene glycol (PEG 200, Scharer and Schlapfer AG, Rothrist, Switzerland) and iopentol (Imagopaque 300, GE Healthcare, Basel, Switzerland) in a mixture ratio of 10:1 (mean radiodensity, 600 Hounsfield units [HU]).2 Primary image evaluation, 2-dimensional reformations, and 3-dimensional reconstructions were performed on a CT workstation (Leonardo, Siemens).
This notion does not take into account that a computer disposes only of the data that have been obtained as a result of radiodensity averaging of the tissue layers encompassed by the X-ray beam.
(2,6) A diagnosis of mycetoma should be considered when computed tomography (CT) demonstrates a focal mass or diffuse area of increased radiodensity and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows a correlating marked decrease in intensity on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, making the fungus ball "invisible" as it blends with the adjacent air of the sinus.
Width and height of radiolucent lesions (areas of bone loss as indicated by decreased radiodensity) were measured with a ruler to the nearest 1 mm and then categorized according to their specific location (i.e., root end opening, alongside the root).
Due to the increased cellularity and subsequent radiodensity of their breast tissues, premenopausal women or those undergoing hormone replacement therapy are not candidates for conventional x-ray mammography.[5]